Trump suggests Chicago implement 'stop and frisk' to curb violence

Trump suggests Chicago implement 'stop and frisk' to curb violence
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Memo: Ayers decision casts harsh light on Trump NASA offers to show Stephen Curry evidence from moon landings Freedom Caucus calls on leadership to include wall funding, end to 'catch and release' in funding bill MORE said Monday that he's directed Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: Mueller closes in on Trump Mueller's findings don't matter The Hill's Morning Report — Trump shakes up staff with eye on 2020, Mueller probe MORE to provide federal assistance to the city of Chicago to limit gun violence and suggested the city implement the controversial practice of "stop and frisk."

"We want to straighten it out and straighten it out fast. There's no reason for what’s going on there," Trump told law enforcement officials at a convention for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

Trump said he's urging Chicago officials to "strongly consider stop and frisk."

"It works, and it was meant for problems like Chicago," Trump said, garnering applause from the audience.

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Trump previously suggested during his 2016 presidential campaign that stop and frisk could be used to help prevent violence in black communities. He has cited its effectiveness in New York City under former Mayor Rudy Giuliani (R), who is now his personal lawyer.

The way in which the city was carrying out the practice, in which police stop, question and frisk a person on the grounds of reasonable suspicion that either the person is dangerous or a crime has been committed, was ruled to have violated the constitution by a federal judge in 2013.

In addition to proposing Chicago implement the policy, Trump said Monday that he'd like city officials to change a 2016 deal between the police department and the American Civil Liberties Union that required city police to document every street stop they made in an effort to curb racial profiling. 

The president suggested that law enforcement had their hands tied by the agreement.

"The crime spree is a terrible blight on that city, and we’ll do everything possible to get it done," Trump said. "I know the law enforcement people in Chicago, and I know how good they are. They could solve the problem if they were simply allowed to do their job and do their job properly."

Trump's directive to get the federal government involved in Chicago comes days after a city police officer was convicted of second-degree murder in the 2014 shooting of teenager Laquan McDonald.

The shooting prompted numerous protests across the city, and the conviction renewed tensions between the community and city law enforcement.

While activists and residents praised the decision as a measure of justice, the Illinois State Police union blasted the jury's decision, calling it a "sham trial and shameful verdict."

Chicago has long struggled with a reputation as a city beset with gun violence, though The Chicago Tribune reported that there have been fewer shooting victims so far in 2018 than at the same point in the previous two years.

The president, whose family owns a building along the Chicago River, has previously threatened to send the federal government into Chicago to address its crime issues. Following a particularly violent weekend in August, Trump blamed the city's leadership.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D), a former chief of staff for President Obama, has positioned himself as an anti-Trump stalwart. He said last year that the city would brand itself as a place where Trump is not welcome. 

Emanuel announced last month that he will not seek reelection in 2019.